Wednesday, July 28, 2010

Ripple Potholder



The RIPPLE pattern has long been a crochet favorite for creating beautiful afghans, blankets, shawls and sweaters. Here is a new twist on the ripple stitch for making functional and attractive potholders to give or keep. In addition to the ripple stitch, the use of unique center embellishments made for a particular person in mind or to match your own kitchen decor.


This post includes the pattern info and how-to's with visuals to make the Ripple Potholder using medium and finer density cottons plus a second, modified pattern for those using heavier (worsted) weight cottons. Also included are photo close-ups of completed Ripple Potholders that may spark your imagination to create your own potholders using different color combinations and graphic elements. Can't wait to see what you make!

This pattern is copyrighted. You are welcome to use it with these guidelines: Be sure to attribute this source when posting or presenting potholders made from this pattern and refrain from publishing or selling the pattern or representing it as your own. Otherwise, no other restrictions apply. Enjoy making these for selling, sharing, gifting or your personal use.

I. Pattern and How-to Instructions for the Ripple Potholder Using Medium and Finer Density Cottons

Recommended yarns: Tahki Cotton Classic yarn, Omega Sinfonia, Elann Sonata are among the recommended yarns for this project. One of these potholders is made of Patons Grace, which is a thinner/finer cotton. Because of the finer density, additional ripple spires were added. J&P Coats Royale Fashion Crochet threads, size 3 (cotton) were used to create the center embellishments.

If you are planning to use the heavier cottons, such as Pisgah's Sugar 'n Creme, Lily's Peaches 'n Cream or Lion Brand Lion Cotton, skip way past this initial pattern to find the modified version expressly for these heavier cottons later on this page. The modified version uses a larger hook, has fewer rounds and one fewer ripple spires.

Note: Be sure to use 100 percent cottons when making potholders as synthetics can melt.

Hook sizes: An F hook was used for the main body of all of the potholders; sizes 1.5 and 2 were used for making the smaller parts of the various center embellishments.

Other items needed: Plastic drapery ring (1 and 1/8"), scissors and a tapestry needle.

Foundation round: With size F hook and 1st color (in this example to the right, green), ch 4, join to make a circle.


Round 1: Ch 3 for the first dc. DC 10 in the circle to make a total of 11 dc's. Join with sl st to the top of the ch 3.


Round 2: Ch 3 for the first dc. Make 2 dc’s in the tops of each st around until you reach the second to last st. In that st, 3 dc’s, skip the st just before the ch 3. Join with a sl st to the ch 3. Total 22 dc’s.


Round 3: Ch 2 for the first hdc. Make 2 hdc’s in the tops of stitches for a total of 42. Join with a sl st to the top of the ch 2. End color and fasten loose yarn tails. Diameter should be about 2.25-2.5 inches.


Round 4: I am not sure of the name of this stitch, but I call it the raised ridge stitch. It is completed in two rounds. This round will cup. Do not be concerned about the cupping. It will lie flat on the second round of this color.







With 2nd color (in this example, royal blue) and working in FRONT loops, only, ch 3 to count as first dc. You are going to increase on this row by 8 because you want exactly 50 stitches. About every fifth or sixth st do 2 dc's. Make the last increase be in the same front loop as the starting 3 ch (the one that counts as your first dc). Insert your hook into the top front loop and complete a sl st.

Refer to the following series of photos to help you with Rounds 4 and 5. This is not a difficult st to work. It is more difficult to explain than it is to do!





















































Round 5: This is the second half of the raised ridge st. With the sl st still on your hook, point your hook down and into the BACK LOOP of the first dc (blue), PLUS down into the BACK LOOP of the previous color (the back loop of green, in this example) and then draw yarn through 2 and then yarn over and draw through the last 2. Repeat this around.


















Sl st to join at the end of the round. Break off and fasten color.
This makes a nice ridge to set off the center, like a little frame around your graphic embellishment.
From this point on, the potholder will be divided into 10 ripple spires.* The reason for 50 stitches in the previous two rounds is that when 10 divides into 50, the result is 5 so that will be the number of stitches for evenly setting up each of the ripple spires. You'll see as we go into the next round how this will work.






















*If you are using J&P Coats Royale Fashion Crochet Thread, size 3 or Patons Grace, you may need to add additional spires. I added two when using a combination of these finer density cottons.


Note: In all ripple rounds, to make valleys, you will skip four dc's (two at the end of one ripple and two at the start of the next ripple). To make your ripples have peaks, always make 2 ch at the top (middle point) of each ripple. For those of you who are visually oriented, it might be easier to see where to start and end each ripple on the following diagram.


Round 6: With your next color, (in this example, cream) ch 3 to act as the first dc. Make a second dc in the same st, ch 2, 2 dc’s in the next st, ch 1, skip 3 st’s. *2 dc in the next st, ch 2, 2 dc in the next st, ch 1, skip 3 st. *repeat to the end. Make sure that the total number of ripple spires is 10. Break off and secure your color.
In the photo above, A is round 6; B is round 7; C is round 8; D is round 9; E is round 10; and F is made up of two rounds: 11 and the joining round.

Round 7: Round 7 is the same as B in the photo above. In this round you will have 3 dc's going up to the peak and 3 going down to the valley with 2 ch between. With your next color (in this example, green) begin in the ch 2 space crochet the following: ch 3 (to count as first dc), 2 dc’s, ch 2, 3 dc’s. In all ch 2 spaces, do the following: *3 dc, 2 ch, 3 dc. Repeat from * around. Join with a sl st at the end of the round. Break off and fasten color.

Round 8: In this round you will have 4 dc's in the half of the ripple going up to the peak and r dc's going down to the valley. With color 2 (in this example, royal blue), ch 3 in the ch 2 space: 1 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. Then 2 dc in the next st. Move to the next ripple: *2 dc’s in the st just before the ch 2. In the ch 2 sp: 2 dc’s, ch 2, 2 dc. 2 dc's in the top of the next st. Repeat from * around. End with 2 dc's in the st before the first ripple. Join with a sl st to end the round. Break off color.


Round 9: In this round, you will have 5 dc's in the half of the ripple going up to each peak and 5 going down to each valley. With color 1 (in this example, green), in the ch 2 space: ch 3 1 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. 1 dc in the next st, 2 dc in the next st. Next ripple and remaining ripples: 2 dc above the second dc past the valley. 1 dc in the next st, 2 dc, 2 ch, 2 dc in the ch 2 sp at the peak, 1 dc in the next st, 2 dc in the next st. Join with a sl st at the end of the round. Break off color.


Round 10: In this round, you will have 6 dc's in the half of the ripple going up to each peak and 6 going down to each valley. With color 3 (in this example, cream), in ch 2 sp: ch 3, 1 dc, ch 2, 2 dc. 1 dc in each of the next 2 st’s. 2 dc in the next st. Next ripple and remaining ripples: 2 dc in the second st past the valley. 1 dc in each of the next 2 st. In the ch 2 sp: 2 dc, 2 ch, 2 dc. 1 dc in each of the next 2 st’s. 2 dc’s in the next st. Join with a sl st at the end of the round.


Round 11: With color 2 (in this example, royal blue), do sc’s around but in this pattern: in the peaks: 2 sc, 2 ch, 2 sc. In the valleys: sc up to the valley, skip the st at the bottom of the valley, sc in the st past the valley.


Make a second potholder for the reverse side. A double-sided potholder is recommended for protection when handling hot pans or dishes and is also aesthetically more pleasing when both sides are finished.


Center embellishment: Before joining both sides together, make this potholder unique with something special added to the center. This featured potholder features a larger daisy on one side and smaller daisies on the reverse side. Here are closer views of the other three potholders with their individual embellishments. The cherry and cupcake potholders are the same on both sides. The grape potholder has a cluster on the front but popcorn clusters in purple (to assimilate grapes) on the back side.
Secure/weave in all loose ends before joining. I like to do this as I go along so that I don't feel it is such a chore at one time.
Joining round: This is the most satisfying round of this potholder and, the most challenging, if never worked before. The stitch is called Tambour Chain Crochet, or more frequently called Top Crochet. This stitch joins the front and back at the outer edge but down into the valleys to the center color, as well. The end result is a very finished looking potholder.
Match up the back and front sides of your potholder, wrong sides facing and matching points. You might want to use large corsage pins to do this making sure the sharp points are tucked in so you won't get pricked.
Starting at the center top of the potholder, (which should be a valley), join yarn but leave a 7 inch tail for attaching the plastic hanging ring at the end of the round. Sc at the center of the valley through both the front and back pieces. Sc in each st to the top of the ripple peak (ch 2 sp). When you get to the ch 2 sp at the peak of the ripple, *sc, c1, sc. Sc in sc's from previous round going down the side of the ripple.


Note: If you would like to see photo visuals of what happens after this point in the round, go to almost the end of this blog page where a series of photos shows the how-to's.


Now, working top crochet, you will be working around and through previous dc rounds while heading toward the center color of the potholder. With the yarn on the hook, go around the last dc round and pull up the yarn from back to front to make your st. This will look like a ch st in the front but a straight st in the back. Continue with your sl st's down, around, though and pull up the yarn through preceding rounds.


When you reach the center color, catch the top loop of the center color on both the front side and back side. Draw up your st. Make this st nice and neat by tightening it carefully to make it lie flat. You might want to hold it in place with your fingernail of your other hand when you pull it up. Now you are going to return from the center back to the outer edge by again going through the same spaces between dc rounds. Assuming you are right handed, your row going back up and toward the outer edge will be just to the left of the row going down toward the center. You will have a line double line in the front that look like ch st's.


Sc in the next in each st going up the next ripple/peak. Repeat from * around. St st to the join with the first sc. Leave a 30 inch tail before breaking off.
Hanger loop: Using a 1 and 1/8 plastic ring, attach the ring to the top of the joined fronts and backs with the short tail from the start of the joining round. With the long tail and a tapestry needle, make tight blanket stitches around and covering your initial attaching rounds with the shorter tail. Secure ends.
Here are closer views of three more potholders with their embellishments.
Grape Ripple Potholder: This potholder was crocheted with a size F hook and Tahki Cotton Classic yarns in rusty gold, green and a peachy color. This was the first potholder I made with a center embellishment because I had a particular person in mind. This was made for one of my ravelry friends, Christina who described her kitchen thusly: "I have kind of an Italian style kitchen—mustards, greens, purples and browns, grapes and apples."
Once I made the first one with an embellishment, then I began thinking how these unique touches made them stand out. After that I had so many ideas about center embellishments that I sketched a page full of them. I made three more unique ones (daisy, cherry and cupcake) to follow this one.

Cherry Ripple Potholder: This potholder was crocheted using a size F hook and thinner cottons: Patons Grace in two colors of blue and J&P Coats Royale Fashion Crochet thread, size 3 in yellow. Because thinner yarns and threads were used, two additional ripple spires were added. The cherries are crocheted circles also of the same J&P Coats crochet thread but in red. I actually used the side of the little red circles that would normally be considered the wrong side as the side that is up. The wrong side seemed to make nicer cherries. The stem was embroidered directly onto the center in an outline stitch. The green leaves are also J&P Coats thread that were crocheted and then attached to the center of the potholder.

Cupcake Ripple Potholder: This potholder was crocheted using a size F hook and thicker cottons: Tahki Cotton Classic yarns in browns and peach. The cupcakes were crocheted using J&P Coats Royale Fashion Crochet thread, size 3 (white and red) and Patons Grace (light blue). These were free-formed. To make the ribbing effect, I crocheted in the back loops.

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II. Alternate Pattern and How-to Instructions for the Ripple Potholder Using Heavier Cottons
Recommended yarns: Because many of you like to make potholders using heavier cottons such as Pisgah's Sugar 'n Creme, Lily's Peaches 'n Cream and Lion Brand Lion Cotton, I worked one up with all three of these yarns to modify the pattern. This version the fastest and easiest because the final potholder will have fewer rounds and one less ripple spire.
Note: Be sure to use 100 percent cottons when making potholders as synthetics can melt.

Right: Here is the potholder I made while I wrote down the pattern modifications. I will be noting color changes according to this potholder so you will know when to change colors, though you will be using your own color combinations. By indicating the colors I used here, you can easily refer back to the picture and know where you are.

Foundation round: With size G hook and 1stcolor (in this example, bright blue), ch 5, join to make a loop.
Round 1: I like to use the same color here and the next two rounds because this will serve as my "canvas" for my center embellishment. I already knew I was going to make an orange against a bright blue background before I started.
Ch 3 to serve as first dc. (Ch 3 as first dc throughout further rounds.) 14 more dc's in the loop for a total of 15. Join with sl st top of ch 3.
Another point here about planning the colors: I wanted my joining color in this potholder to be the same bright blue as the center so I planned that it would be the final sc round, and also the final joining round which goes down between the spires.
Round 2: Ch 3, dc in same st. 2 dc's in the each st around. Sl st to top of beg ch 3. (30 dc's)
Round 3: Ch 2, hdc in same st. *1 hdc in next st, 2 hdc in next st. Repeat from * around. Join with sl st top of ch 2. Fasten off. (45 hdc)
Next is the start of your ripple rounds. BEFORE GETTING STARTED: Return above to do two things: 1. read the part in bold that says "Note:" and 2. look at the diagram so you will understand the theory of constructing ripples for this potholder. Having a grasp of ripple construction will help you complete this potholder with ease.
Round 4: Join new color in any st of round 3 (in the example potholder, hot lime green color). Ch 3, dc in same st, ch 2. 2 dc in next st. Ch 1, *Skip next 3 st's, work 2 dc's in the next st, ch 2, 2 dc's in the next st, ch 1. Repeat from * around. Sl st to top of ch 3. Fasten off. (Nine ripple peaks.)
Round 5: Now you are going to see this ripple really start to take shape. This round will have 3 dc's going up to the peak of the ripple and 3 dc's going down to the valley.
With your next color (ecru in this example potholder), join new color in any ch 2 space and make 3 ch st, 2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc in same space. In next ch 2 sp work *3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc. Repeat from * around. Sl st to top of beg. ch 3. Fasten off.
Round 6: This round will have 4 dc's going up to the peak of the ripple and 4 dc's going down to the valley but this time not all of the dc's will be in the ch 2 space.
Join new color in any ch 2 sp (in the example potholder, dark green color), ch 3, dc, ch 2, 2 dc in same sp. 2 dc in next dc, *skip next 4 dc, 2 dc in next dc, work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp. (V ripple made) 2 dc in next dc. Repeat from *. Skip next 4 dc, 2 dc in next dc. Finish round with sl st in top of ch 3.
Round 7: This round will have 5 dc's going up to the peak of the ripple and 5 dc's going down to the valley.
Join new color in any ch 2 space. Ch 3, dc, ch 2, 2 dc in the same sp. *Dc in next dc, 2 dc in next dc, skip next 4 dc's. In next dc, work 2 dc, dc in next dc. Work V-ripple (refer to bold in Round 6) in next ch 2 sp. Repeat from *. Skip next 4 dc, 2 dc in next dc, 1 dc in next dc. Finish round with sl st in top of ch 3. Fasten off.
Round 8: (border/outline color) This round will be all sc's because this round, when coupled with the final joining round of sc's, appear as one. Together, they are almost same height as the previous dc rounds.
Join final color, with sc in any ch 2 space, ch 2, sc in same sp. *Sc in each of next 10 st (five sc down and five sc up). In ch 2 sp work 1 sc, ch 2, 1 sc. Repeat from * around. Finish round with sl st to top of first sc. Fasten off and work in all ends.
Make an exact duplicate of this potholder for the reverse side.
Before the final joining round, embellish your potholder with a small graphic. In this potholder, I made a small orange with a stem and two leaves. There is also a little blossom at the base of the orange. I want to share a great trick her with you about embellishments. Recently I needed some particular colors for a one-of-a-kind potholder but couldn't find the right colors, sheen and light-weight density of cottons. I also I didn't want to buy whole skeins, even if I could find the right colors, etc. for such tiny parts of this potholder. That would have been too spendy sooooo I had this great idea: DMC cotton! Even when not on sale, these little "skeins" are only about 35¢ and come in hundreds of colors. I bought just what I needed and didn't spend much for that particular potholder and now I am using DNC for little touches, like these center embellishments. On this potholder, I used all 6 strands of bright orange DMC and a size 2 crochet hook to make this orange. The leaves are also DMC cotton embroidery floss. The blossom is made of Omega Sinfonia.
The embellishments are attached before the final joining round.
A little trick on adding embellishments: When I am done making a piece, I leave a long, long tail for sewing on. For instance, on this orange (which is simply rounds of sc's), I left a 2 foot tail. Then I pinned the embellishment in place. Using a smaller blunt-nosed needle, I made my stitches INSIDE of the final round of st's. This leaves a very pristine edge. If you stitch into that final sc round, it looks rough/jagged.
BUT, I have to confess something. As I was stitching this orange onto the potholder front, I didn't get it lined up the way I should have. I think the top of the potholder should be in a valley and I somehow shifted this and it is not lined up correctly. Make sure your potholder embellishment is properly lined up so that it is not skewed. In this case, "Do as I say...not as I do...."
Round 9 (joining round): With wrong sides together and right sides facing out, match up points of both sides of potholder. Starting at the center top of the potholder, (which should be a valley), join yarn (and leaving a 7 inch tail for later use to attach the hanging ring) sc through both front and back pieces. [Refer to a, right]
You are going to go toward the center of the potholder with a series of top crochet stitches in the valley between ripples. Work top crochet stitches like this: around the last dc round (round 7) to the back to catch the yarn and bring it from the back to the front to complete what looks like a ch stitch. Continue toward the center going down, around, under the next dc round to the back and picking up the yarn to bring to the front. [Refer to b.] This photo shows the hook pointed down, around and under a dc round.The next photo [Refer to c.] shows the yarn, having been caught from the back and being brought up to make the front st. The back st is a straight line but the front st looks like a ch.

Note: Be sure to keep checking the back to make sure you are catching the stitch in the same open space under the dc rounds on both sides of the potholder.

Continue toward the center with the front to back top crochet stitches. At the center, catch the top st of the center color on both the front and back sides. Draw up your stitch to make a nice, neat little st. [Refer to d.] You may want to use your fingernail (left hand) to hold the st in place as you complete the pulling up.

At this point, you will be going back up toward the outer edge. Your stitches will be adjacent to the first line of st going down and slightly to the left.

This photo [Refer to e.] shows the nearly finished second row of st's returning back to the outer edge. At this point, when you reach the top, go over the top to catch the yarn and draw up.

Continue with sc's in each st, again going through both front and back pieces, to the top of the ripple peak (i.e. ch 2 sp). When you get to the ch 2 sp, *sc, c1, sc. Sc in next 6 sc going down the side of the ripple, continue with the two lines of stitches as shown in photo examples a-e.
Continue around the potholder [Refer to f.] Sc in the next 6 st's to the left of the valley (going up the next ripple/peak) Repeat from * around. St st to the top of the first sc. Leave a 30 inch tail before breaking off.

Plastic hanging loop: Using a blunt tapestry needle and with the 7 inch yarn tail, secure the loop in place by going around the ring a few times and catching the body of the potholder with each loop.

Then, with the longer yarn tail, make tight button hole/blanket stitches around the loop. Cover your initial securing loops with blanket stitches to conceal them.

Please email me if some part of this pattern/explanation needs clarifying or correcting. Pattern improvements are welcome and may help others, too.
Copyright 2010, C. Lowman/Delights. All Rights Reserved.

35 comments:

  1. What a well-written pattern! Thanks for much for sharing it. There are going to be many of tehse made for Christmas gifts this year.

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  2. THEY LOOK BEAUTIFUL. Thank you very much for shating the pattern.
    Hugs, DanielaH

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  3. Thank you very much for the pattern for this nice and beautiful coloured potholders. I like to try to crochet 2 pieces.
    Greetings from Switzerland
    Baba64

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  4. Love 'em and will make one or more. The centers are a fun addition to personalize.
    Thank you for sharing your talent.
    Knitastitch (Melissa)

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  5. Thanks everyone for your wonderful comments.

    Isn't this exciting...that we can all connect, though we are separated by thousands of miles?!! Switzerland, even. Amazing.

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  6. Thank you so much! I absolutely love my grapes!! It's on the counter for everyone to admire and everyone has been instructed to not touch!
    It turned out beautiful, a little piece of "art" for my kitchen. :)

    Hugs and lots of thank yous, over and over and over!

    Christina (braydenbugsmom Ravelry)

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  7. Beautiful, as always! I'm excited to see the pattern published! You are a talented lady.

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  8. Thank you for posting this wonderful design; I'm looking forward to trying it!

    Barbara (ravelry: Potchke)

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  9. Thank you for sharing your talent. THis project solves a gift idea... actually a couple. THe center embellishment really makes it special. ANd I love the way you wrote the pattern and included helpful hints about yarns, hook sizes, etc. You are very generous!

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  10. Your blog and pattern are featured on our yahoo group, ThreadAddicts, as a Friday Share.
    These are the most beautiful potholders I've ever seen and your tutorial is superb!
    Thank you!!!!

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  11. Greetings from Estonia and thank you so much for sharing the pattern. Beautiful potholders. Love them.

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  12. I just finished my first potholder using your pattern - and it looks like a stained glass window. I used a varigated Peaches n Cream yarn along with two solid colors...beautiful. Your directions were letter perfect and full of helpful details. Thank you so much!

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  13. Thank you for your nice comment. It sounds like you are pleased with the outcome. Maybe you could share a photo of your potholder.

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  14. Very nice and beautiful.Happy New Year!

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  15. These are just epic. I'm going to be making these very soon. Thanks for sharing!!!!!!

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  16. Wow, I just love these potholders! I can't wait to start making some. Just in time for Christmas...Thanks so much!!

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  17. i wish i had seen these potholders before Christmas. i would have given away some to my friends. these potholders are something. really love them.
    can i ask you to feature equally wonderful and delightful designs of kitchen towel toppers?

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  18. I am so excited to try these! You have amazing artistic talent, your directions are clear and your pictures are wonderful thru/o the directions!! Thank you so much!!

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  19. you take the lowley pot holder to grandness
    lady you have tallent. thank you for sharing

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  20. I love all the pics they are great! :) Thank you.

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  21. just a brief note to thank you so very much for sharing these patts and tutorials with us; It's so awesome that there are such generous people in this world,as yourself! At one time long ago,extended families lived together and multi generations shared the same household where needle arts and baking etc,were handed down and taught to others...I have little family left,and often consult the internet for classroom exp and connections to the world.

    You are an amazing person with a wonderful sharing spirit,as well as a wonderful teacher-I taught professionally for 40+ yrs,and you are more than qualified to serve as one yourself(I must admit I did not read your profile,so if you are,or were a teacher,you have certainly proven your skill and ability as one)

    Kindest regards,Heidi

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  22. Thank you for your pattern. I really like the way these look, and am trying to make them now. I am using Peaches and Cream yarn and size G hook, and my potholder has much bigger holes than the ones in the photos. I'm not sure if I'm doing something wrong, or if after I make the back and sew them together they will look less big? Any ideas? thanks! NancyJean

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    1. NancyJean, you will be filling in open spaces when you attach the back to the front and, very likely, this will take care of your concern. It sounds like you may crochet more loosely but without seeing your work, it is difficult to know if there is any issue with your construction or if you are just prematurely concerned about an issue that will resolve itself when you put both pieces together.

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    2. Oh thanks for the speedy answer. I am the loosest crocheter I've ever met, so that might be all there is to it, and if the overstitching helps to fill in then I think I'll be alright.
      Thanks!

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    3. Since you crochet loosely, you may need to leave off the last row on each side (before joining) so you won't have a gigantic potholder which turns out to be more the size of a cabana umbrella.

      Next time, you might even go down another size hook, to an F.

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  23. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  24. ncarapaica@hotmail.comSeptember 1, 2012 at 6:08 PM

    Thank you for sharing your pattern. Greetings from Venezuela.

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  25. beautiful work love it and thank you for sharing !

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  26. I am so glad I found you from Pinterest. Your instructions are so helpful. Thank you!

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  27. your potholders are absolutely adorable.... thanks for sharing

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  28. This is beautiful!! Thank you so much for sharing the pattern!

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  29. I'm totally swept away by this beautiful pattern !!!
    I'm going to get down to crocheting one right away :-)
    My plan is to ultimately make an afghan or blanket (with wool) once I get this right. I've been looking soooo long for a nice flower-y pattern !

    Thank you so much for the pattern and your laboriously detailed instructions.
    Meenakshi

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  30. Love them and will make a couple for our daughter who's setting up a new home. Thanks for generously sharing your Great design..:)

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  31. I wrote your pattern and I will try to make the potholder as soon I finish my afghan..The potholder was so nice I couldn resist to copy the pattern and try to make it. Tanks for that pattern. AM.Grenier

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  32. I'm almost done with my first one of these and I already know this pattern will stay in my repertoire. It gives you a lot of visual 'bang for your buck'. Thank you so much for the clear pattern and wonderful result!

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